There are many jobs on the build that don’t look like they are going to take long but end up taking hours. It took me all of 6 hours today to cove and tape the starboard webs and to fit, glue and tape most of the port saloon web. I can see why the fit out takes twice as long as making the shell. Every job takes so long to do. Anyway I am almost done on the webs, I just have 5 of the 6 cross webs to cove and tape on the port hull.

Whilst I really already knew this, I am now utterly convinced that you should never glue any panels that need to be coved and taped with the intention of coving and taping when they are set. I tried that on the starboard saloon webs thinking that coving and taping would be so much easier if the panel could not move because it was set in place. Big Mistake. No matter how well you think you have cleaned excess glue you just cant seem to get rid of it all and it sets hard and stops you being able to clean up excess coving filler with a scraper. It stops you pushing the scraper along the panel so you have to pull it and this is never as effective. Think shaving. Anyway, it is not the end of the world but it is not as easy as it would be if you glue, cove and tape wet on wet.

Having said all of that, I ran out of time today when doing the port saloon web and only managed to cove and tape the centre panel (in one piece each side) and to glue the side panels in and coved and taped just 1 side of the 6 sides. So tomorrow I will cove and glass these last few side webs and be finished on the webs.

port saloon webport saloon web tapedsb saloon web insb saloon web taped

I figure about an hour or so to cove and tape the last few sections. Then maybe another hour or so fitting (trimming) the soles and I am finished the hull floors for now.

Also, I passed another milestone today. I went past 1000 hours working on the boat. I started on the actual boat work on 24 October 2005 (I started on the strongback in Sept 05) so I have another 2 months before I hit 2 years. I am not doing as many hours per month as I had originally set myself. I planned on completing 4000 hours in about 5 years so I needed to average 66 hours per month. But at the rate I have gone I will be at about 1100 hours in 24 months or 45 hours a month. I need to pick that up to about 80 hours a month so about double what I am currently doing to get finished on time. I will try to do that. I may not need as many hours as a standard rig would take as I wont have to make composite chainplates or fittings for rigging, so I will save a lot of hours there. I am also keen to minimise internal fairing by using linings throughout the boat so this may also save some time. Nevertheless I will have to ramp up the work to keep on schedule. It is not that big a task, for example I can start doing 8 hour days on weekends instead of 6.

Once I have fitted the soles (I set myself the goal of getting them down before I go to the snow) I can start to think about the next step of finishing and fitting the forebeam.

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Paul