The last 2 doorways, the aft bedroom opening and the ensuite toilet cubicle opening have had the uni rope applied to the decored trenches. Each one took about 1.5 hours. I also cleaned up the last of the doorways in the port hull. As with most things on the build the more you do something the better the results I seem to get, which is fairly normal. I took the mdf off the 2 doorways I had done in the port hull yesterday and I was blown away at how good a job I had done. So good that I dont have a single fill area or ripple in the glossy finish, all I have to do is sand the sides flat again for a sharp edge. I will have to sand that glass finish to key it so paint will stick to it but it will be a shame, they seriously look that good. I tried to get a photo but the camera simply could not show what the eye can see.

Sanding the edges of the doorways that have set took about half an hour to do the 4 sides of 2 doorways. Grinding with a 3 inch grinder is about the second worst job on the build (fairing is the worst). The spinning high speed disc sends talcum fine dust all over you. If its hot it sticks to your moist skin and is itchy, so the solution is to wear long sleeve shirts and pants, gloves and a breathing mask is mandatory, you must wear one, and I find my full face mask is best because it also stops dust getting in your eyes. So it is hot, miserable work, but there is no other way to do it and it has to be done. The 2 most used power tools on any build is a good battery drill and a light angle grinder with sanding discs on it.

After sending dust all over myself and the inside of the boat I decided to start cleaning up before starting on the robe furniture. I gave myself a blow down then got the vacuum cleaner and broom and pan and cleaned the the first 2 sections (ensuite and bedroom) of the port hull. There is a build up of fairing dust on everything and I have not done any cleaning up for over a month. To use the vernacular, the place is a shitfight. But it hasn’t seemed worthwhile cleaning while the boys were fairing, anything I did clean would be covered in dust in just 1 day. So consequently rubbish is piling up everywhere. The solution is a big clean up, which I plan to do very soon, as soon as 9lives leaves the shed. In the meantime I will clean up the areas I am working in as I go. Today I cleaned up all of the balsa removed from the forward 2 doorways and all of the rubbish (peelply, gloves, etc) from the port hull and vacuumed the dust off the walls and floor. That took about a half hour.

Then I glued and glassed the kickboard into the wardrobe. It is the first step in building the entire cabinet. The kickboard and bottom shelf are glued and glassed to each other forming a T shape. I cannot glass where the inside of the kickboard meets the sole and hull side but I cam able to glass the front and top. This will more than secure it. I glued it, coved it and glassed it along the front and top and applied peel ply and left it to set. Next I will be able to glue and glass the rest of the cabinet to the base. The the top will glue and glass to that, but before that happens I still have to figure out the way I will set the rest of the shelves. I have not decided yet if I will have draws along the front bulkhead or shelves and cupboard doors, probably shelves and doors.

Then to finish for the day I spent another half an hour grinding resin off the factory floor. I figure if I do half an hour or so every day it wont seem like such a chore. It has become pertinent now because Denis will be wheeling his boat out of the shed soon and the way the floor is I am concerned that it might stop the wheels rolling. Of course before I can move out the floor needs to be restored so I dont lose my bond. I am just a bit annoyed that I am left to do it. Long after the party is over someone has to clean up. Also annoying is just a little prevention like putting drip sheets down would have saved a lot of this work. I understand drips and drops happen even when you put down drop sheets (cardboard, plastic, mdf) and cleaning them up when still wet is also a chore, but believe me, when they are set cleaning the up is much much harder. Rant over.

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Paul